The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Drama (DR)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

DR 99: High School Drama Institute

0.00 Credits

no description available

DR 101: Theatre I

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the nature of theatre as a performing art. Students study selected plays from the perspectives of actors and directors, and the strategies of playwrights to develop the ability to imagine the play in performance and to appreciate the range of theatre's possibilities. Required of concentrators and sub-concentrators.

DR 102: Introduction to the Alexander Technique

3.00 Credits

This class is an introduction to the principles of the Alexander Technique. The course is designed for performers and anyone else who want to free their bodies for maximum efficiency for self-expression. It will enable the student to identify harmful habits that interfere with their freedom of movement and balance. Students will learn to release bodily tension and move with more ease and poise thus becoming more conscious and accountable for the way they use their bodies. Classwork includes understanding Alexander's principles, simple anatomy, developmental movement, breathing, relaxation techniques, and class presentations. Course book required first day of class.

DR 104: Theatre II

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the technical elements of theatrical production (e.g., sets, lights, costumes, and sound) and their relation to each other. Involves hands-on, practical work. Students also consider the major types of theatrical organizations. Required of concentrators.

DR 110: Theatre World

3.00 Credits

Designed as a humanities elective for students in fields other than drama. Introduces students to a broad spectrum of theatrical experiences and plays, preparing students for an informed and lively engagement with the art in the contemporary world. Involves attendance of selected University and professional productions. Some fees are necessary to cover ticket costs.

DR 201: Theatre Topics

3.00 Credits

Study of drama, theatre, criticism, and culture through focus on selected problems, issues, or periods. Topics and faculty for each term announced in advance. Recent topics have included theatre architecture; critical approaches to drama from Freud to feminism; plays of political, social, and personal expression; the role of the director in pre-modern, modern, and post-modern eras; and plays since World War II. Open as humanities electives. Drama concentrators must take a total of three theatre topics courses, one of which must be 305 (see below). Courses may involve costs of attending professional theatre productions.

DR 202: Theatre Topics

3.00 Credits

Study of drama, theatre, criticism, and culture through focus on selected problems, issues, or periods. Topics and faculty for each term announced in advance. Recent topics have included theatre architecture; critical approaches to drama from Freud to feminism; plays of political, social, and personal expression; the role of the director in pre-modern, modern, and post-modern eras; and plays since World War II. Open as humanities electives. Drama concentrators must take a total of three theatre topics courses, one of which must be 305 (see below). Courses may involve costs of attending professional theatre productions.

DR 205: Introduction to Speech Communications

3.00 Credits

Theory and exercises in speech communication, emphasizing perception, language (verbal and nonverbal), and interaction. Students apply principles in a variety of transactions.

DR 206: Acting I

3.00 Credits

Self discovery. Acting I is an introduction to the basic elements of the Stanislavski system. Students train in exercises to develop concentration, imagination and life observation. Improvisations will encourage physical freedom and a sense of truth. This beginning work will teach stage craft, "moment to moment" spontaneity and a specific approach to researching and rehearsing a contemporary scene and monologue.

DR 207: Introduction to Design

3.00 Credits

An entry-level design course, focusing on the development of a comprehensive production aesthetic for a dramatic production . Scene, costume, light, and sound design are taught in the service of plays and production concepts. Required of concentrators. Prerequisites: 104 or equivalent.

DR 300: Performance 300

3.00 Credits

The course is an elective. It allows students to engage in intensive training and learn alternative performance styles with professional theatre artists. The course encourages collaboration among the students and the instructor. With the supervision of the instructor, the students will use their training to devise an original work. The students present their work through an informal staging at the end of the semester. Departmental consent required.

DR 305: Theatre Topics III

3.00 Credits

This course studies filmed adaptations of Shakespeare's plays. The students will examine how contemporary directors and actors have animated the following plays: Romeo & Juliet, Othello, Henry V, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Richard III, and Hamlet. We will view and discuss such diverse interpretations as Leonardo DiCaprio's gun-toting Romeo, Natalie Woods' singing Juliet, and Mel Gibson's confused and college bound Hamlet. The artists we will study include: Sir Lawrence Olivier, Ian McKellan, Kenneth Branagh, and Orson Welles.

DR 306: Theatre Production

3.00 Credits

Study of the business of theatre and theatrical organization. Students study the importance of various aspects of a viable theatrical organization including: the mission statement, incorporation and non-profit status, control boards, funding sources, and strategies. As part of the class, students will create a hypothetical theatrical organization, locate and design a venue in the U.S., identify funding sources and develop an inaugural season based on the organization's mission statement. Required of concentrators. Prerequisites: 104, 201 or 202, and 207.

DR 307: Speech for the Actor

3.00 Credits

Lecture/Studio A voice and speech course that enables students to learn experientially the basic tools of 'acting through voice' by exploring Relaxation, Alignment, Breathing, Phonation, Resonation, Articulation, Vocal Range, Inflection and Rhythm Skills through the development of a daily vocal workout and warm-up; to develop Articulation, Listening and Hearing Skills for regional dialect correction and dialect acquisition through learning the International Phonetic Alphabet and thereby to acquire the knowledge and use of their own voices and speech as it expresses in multiple ways their senses, emotions, images and intentions with different kinds of text..

DR 312: Directing I

3.00 Credits

Introduction to stage directing and basic directorial concepts and techniques, applied to scenes and short plays. Required of Majors. For Drama majors only. Prerequisites: DR 201, 202 and 206.

DR 320: Improvisation Workshop

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 341: Costume Construction

3.00 Credits

Students are trained in the skills required to create costumes from renderings, including skills of basic sewing, patterning, draping, fitting, fabric selection, fabric dyeing and painting, and millinery. Prerequisites: 104 or permission of department.

DR 380: British Drama (London)

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 403: Public Speaking

3.00 Credits

An introduction ot the rhetorical types and techniques of platform speaking and to the organization of speech materials. Develops the skills needed for effective communication in public settings. Topics include speech development and structure, audience analysis, presentation techniques, and critical listening. Open to students in all disciplines.

DR 407: Advanced Speech for the Actor

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 415: Acting II

3.00 Credits

Characterization. Acting II is a continuation of self discovery and script analysis using the basic elements of the Stanislavski system, focused more directly toward developing the skills necessary to create characterization in monologues and scenes from contemporary plays. Prerequisite: 206 or permission of instructor.

DR 451: Senior Seminar

3.00 Credits

Selected readings and research projects form the basis for discussion and papers involving a synthesis of previous knowledge acquired in the field of drama and in the liberal arts program. Required of concentrators. Prerequisites: All previous courses on Drama track.

DR 465: Acting III

3.00 Credits

Advanced Scene work and Shakespeare. Creating characters in monologues and scenes from classical and modern plays, with a concentration on those of Shakespeare. Acting III is also an introduction to the business of acting, developing audition material, practicing cold readings, understanding headshot/resume requirements and how to pursue a career in the theatre. Prerequisites: DR 206 and DR 415.

DR 495: Theatre Internship

3.00 Credits

Advanced Drama students work with a professional theatre company or distinguished art institution in such capacities as are mutually agreed upon by the student, the company, and the student advisor. Each student is responsible for seeking and winning such an internship position; the availability of internships cannot be guaranteed. The student must develop, in conjunction with the instructor/advisor and responsible members of the professional theatre staff, a detailed proposal that includes a description of the responsibilities of the student, the extent of the commitment in terms of time, and the means by which the student is to be evaluated at the end of the internship. Proposals will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, considering the impact on the department's productions, the value of the internship for the particular student's development, and the student's overall record. Students working in internships should commit to no other department obligations in that term and should be aware that an internship may lengthen the time needed to complete their degree program.

DR 498: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination

0.00 Credits

no description available

DR 507: Drama in Education I

3.00 Credits

This course offers an introduction to the philosophy, methodologies, and practice of drama in education. This is a form of learning in which teachers and students engage in lessons that integrate drama and other curriculum subjects to achieve objectives in both. Course readings and written assignments are based on the work of American and British educational drama practitioners. Students in the M.A. Theatre Education (M.A.T.E.) program will complete a lab assignment that requires them to work with young adults or children to practice and reflect on drama in education techniques. All students will learn practical and effective ways to merge drama with curriculum content to increase student learning and engagement.

DR 509: Drama in Education II

3.00 Credits

This course expands on the educational drama work begun in DR507 by exploring additional drama in education techniques. As in DR507, course readings and written assignments are based on the work of American and British educational drama practitioners. Students in the M.A. Theatre Education (M.A.T.E.) program will complete a lab assignment that requires them to work with young adults or children to practice and reflect on drama in education techniques. All students will learn practical and effective ways to merge drama with curriculum content to increase student learning and engagement. NOTE: You do not have to take Part I before Part II.

DR 510: Summer Institute: Drama and Music: Powerful Tools for Teaching Reading and Writing

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 511: Summer Institute (no credit): Drama and Music: Powerful Tools for Teaching Reading and Writing

0.00 Credits

no description available

DR 524: Acting/Directing Workshop

3.00 Credits

The goal of this course is to provide educators who work with young people strategies for helping beginning actors enhance their performance work. Using scenes and monologues, course participants will explore the rehearsal process from both the actor's and director's points of view. They will experience exercises and practices intended to increase their effectiveness coaching actors both in the drama classroom and on the stage.

DR 526: Teaching Theatre

3.00 Credits

With its focus on teaching theatre at the elementary, middle, and high school levels, this course will build and increase students' understanding of the curricular and extracurricular aspects of the work of a teacher of theatre. Students will experience, explore, and discuss various teaching strategies and curriculum choices in course content and materials to begin to form personal teaching methodologies. The issues of assessment, classroom management, diversity, and accessibility as aspects of the teaching of theatre form a thread that runs throughout the semester as students examine, create, and share materials for use in future theatre teaching.

DR 540: Scene Design

3.00 Credits

A study of modern theories of scene design and practice in the research and creation of the stage setting for both period and modern plays in the contemporary theatre. The course includes sections on drafting techniques, rendering styles, and scale model construction. Prerequisites: 104 and 207 or permission of instructor.

DR 541: Scene Painting

3.00 Credits

Practical training in paints, painting tools, and layout and painting techniques for flats, drops, scrims, and three-dimensional surfaces. Coverage includes translucent painting, scrim and large drop layout and painting, and techniques for foliage and architectural painting.

DR 542: Design Applications

3.00 Credits

The course explores the aesthetic fundamentals of theatrical production. All successful productions are based on the synthesis of all the disparate production elements. Instruction will focus on the elements and function of design in the presentation of a dramatic event. Students will explore script analysis and concept development. They will create floor plans and sections, concept boards, and learn the communication tools of the scenic designer. Costume design, perspective sketching, model construction, and lighting and sound design are also components of the active learning experiences of this course.

DR 543: Stage Lighting

3.00 Credits

A study of methods and materials for lighting the stage. Courses focus on script analysis, the design process, equipment, and application. The illustration and application of the uses of light, both for illumination and for subtle dramatic purposes. Prerequisites: 104, and 207 or permission of instructor.

DR 545: Production Design and Management

3.00 Credits

This course focuses on the practical creation of the design element for theatrical production. Students will learn the basics of stagecraft in the fields of construction, painting, costumes, lighting, and sound. The level of complexity will be based on the experience and goals of the individual student and the application methods most appropriate to the student's specific area of interest. The course objective is to supply students with an understanding of the processes and resources used in the creation of a theatrical production and to enable them to determine the best method of reaching practical production goals within existing parameters.

DR 549: Costume Design

3.00 Credits

A survey of costume design techniques, including character analysis, research, rendering skills, and fabric choices, each considered within the context of the production. Prerequisites: 104 and 207.

DR 565: Playwriting I

3.00 Credits

Study and practice of dramatic writing for the stage. Selected plays and productions, and scenes written by class members, are analyzed in class discussions. Class members regularly read aloud scenes written by other class members. Repeatable for credit.

DR 566: Screenwriting

3.00 Credits

This class will introduce the basics of writing for film, including formatting, structure, plot development and characterization. Using film clips and trade reports, we will also discuss the contemporary film industry - including both studio and independent films - and current writing trends. The end result will be the writing of a polished, hour-long film script.

DR 572: Ireland in the Early Modern Imagination

3.00 Credits

This seminar investigates how histories, newspapers, maps, paintings, prints, and plays represented Ireland's landscape and its inhabitants to the British Isles and the Continent. From William Camden to William Shakespeare, the course focuses on the most influential Irish and British authors whose narratives underscored the need to transform the island Kingdom into something more like England.

DR 575: The Plays of Edward Albee

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 576: From Shakespeare to Sheridan, the Irish in the Theatre, 1600-1775

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 594: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

Independent projects developed in consultation with a departmental faculty mentor. Permission of department required.

DR 601: Introduction to Theatre Research

3.00 Credits

An introduction to tools for research in theatre history and dramatic literature and to traditional and new methods in historiography. Each student develops, with the guidance of the instructor, a research project. Required in the M.A. program; open to all graduate students and to seniors by permission of instructor.

DR 603: Western Theatre and Culture I

3.00 Credits

A study of theatrical production in selected major periods in Western nations such as ancient Greece and Elizabethan-Jacobean England (603) or eighteenth-century England and nineteenth-century America (608). Chief attention to the play in performance, to staging methods, theatre architecture, acting, audiences, production organization and finance, and all of these as they intersect with cultural processes. Also introduces historiographical issues such as periodization problems, and cultural studies in race, gender, power, and class.

DR 604: Dramatic Structures I

3.00 Credits

Historical and comparative exploration of significant plays in major periods in Western drama. The historic sequence of plays is intersected with responses to them from throughout the ages in plays and theories. For example, the Medea works of Seneca and Heiner Muller are juxtaposed and examined in light of feminist and semiotic readings; Sophocles and Euripides are read in conjunction with Aristotle, Nietzsche, and Lee Breuer's The Gospel at Colonus; the Don Juans of Tirso de Molina, Moliere, Mozart, and Shaw are juxtaposed, considered in light of contemporary productions, and read with Kierkegaard. Contextual readings are not limited to dramatic theory.

DR 605: Modern European Drama

3.00 Credits

Analysis and interpretation of the works of major European playwrights: Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Shaw, Pirandello, Anouilh, Brecht, Durrenmatt, Beckett, and Ionesco.

DR 606: Theatre Theory

3.00 Credits

Study of selected texts in Western criticism, with emphasis on twentieth-century theories. Critical readings and considerations of theatrical performances are selected to raise contemporary intellectual, ethical, and aesthetic problems. Twentieth-century readings include works representing gender studies, post-colonial studies, and cultural materialism. A sound background in the drama and theatre of major western periods is necessary. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

DR 608: Western Theatre & Culture II

3.00 Credits

A study of theatrical production in two or three selected major periods in Western nations, such as ancient Greece and Elizabethan-Jacobean England (603) or eighteenth-century England and nineteenth-century America (608). Chief attention to the play in performance, to staging methods, theatre architecture, acting, audiences, production organization and finance, and all of these as they intersect with cultural processes. Students also are introduced to historiographical issues, such as periodization problems, and to cultural studies in race, gender, power, and class.

DR 610: Twentieth Century Theatres

3.00 Credits

A study of selected major European and American innovators and innovative movements in theatre from the late 19th to the early 21st-century. The readings focus on those artists and movements that have influenced how contemporary practitioners and audiences produce and view live performance. By investigating the major innovators alongside readings in multicultural, feminist, and postmodern theatre practices as well as popular theatre and performance art, the course examines how alternative forms of performance have impacted mainstream and commercial theatre. The course's readings include but are not limited to the selected works of Maeterlink, Tzara, Apollinaire, Meyerhold, Artaud, Grotowski, Brook, Bogart, and Taymor.

DR 629: Integrated Movement

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 630: Graduate Acting I

3.00 Credits

Stanislavski methodology utilized for scene preparation which will involve analysis of text to determine the actor's actions and objectives. It is the study of the playwright's work, exploring the actor's job from page to stage. The actor will continue to develop a personal and professional rehearsal process, utilizing contemporary texts.

DR 631: Grad Acting II

3.00 Credits

Modern Drama and the Rehearsal Process. Students continue developing their rehearsal process and script analysis as they explore the actor's actions and objectives from a broader range of monologues and scenes that are chosen from modern dramatists such as: O'Neill, Chekov, Strindberg, Ibsen and Shaw.

DR 632: Alexander Technique

2.00 Credits

Students learn and begin to apply principles of the Alexander Technique to class work. The objective: to enable students to free the body for maximum efficiency of self-expression by identifying unwanted movement patterns and emotional constrictions and by releasing bodily tension. Students learn to move with more ease and freedom, and in general become more conscious of and accountable for the ways in which they use their bodies. Class work includes simple anatomy, developmental movement, monologue video critique, breathing, and relaxation techniques. Private hands-on sessions are included in the course work. For M.F.A. students.

DR 633: Alexander Technique II

2.00 Credits

Continuation of Alexander I. This course is a more intense exploration of the students' emotional and physical bodies. Application of the principles of the Alexander Technique becomes more specific. Students gain a greater understanding of the stress and startle patterns of their bodies and that of their characters. Study of emotional anatomy and other movement modalities will be included. Private hands-on sessions continued. Includes the application of the principles to character and scene work. For M.F.A. students. Pre-requisite: DR 632.

DR 634: Forms of Movement I

2.00 Credits

Self awareness. This course is designed to develop greater physical condition, strength and flexibility; a sense of "relaxed readiness", and to deepen the students availability for thought, feeling and impulse. It will focus on developing a sense of how to move economically in space along with an increased kinesthetic observation for characterization purposes. Exercises and improvisations will awaken the actor's availability to physical, emotional, psychological impulse while strengthening and stretching the body.

DR 635: Forms of Movement II

2.00 Credits

Physical characterization. This work can include but is not limited to bringing the techniques of "vocal sequencing", physical impulse work, yoga, neutral mask work, and Pilates into a personal acting process from which to create characterization.

DR 636: Forms of Movement III

2.00 Credits

Commedia dell'Arte plus. This work can include but is not limited to a concentration on body language, pantomime, isolation, balance, body mask, improvisations in silent acting using various styles and approaches such as Chaplin, Commedia, melodrama, grotesque, farce and comedy. . It can include group improvisation and scene study leading into the development of a production in this style, exploring various elements such as sound, music, costume and props.

DR 637: Forms of Movement IV

2.00 Credits

Stage violence. Stage combat is the art of creating the illusion of violence for the stage. This course will study the basics of unarmed as well as rapier techniques, creating choreography and ensemble work.

DR 638: Performance Studio I

3.00 Credits

Experiencing the creative process. Students train in exercises to develop concentration, physical freedom on stage, increased relaxation and imagination as well as a sense of behavioral truth and spontaneity. It is a course that will practice the art of rehearsing toward an actor's independence in staging and characterization. It is a customized work that will endeavor to enhance skills already possessed by the individual as well as foundational work that concentrates on in the moment behavior with present, reactionary and viscerally active rehearsal techniques. The class will incorporate improvisations, texts, and characters that are contemporary and closer to the actor's life experience.

DR 639: Performance Studio II

3.00 Credits

Inhabiting a role. Continued concentration on the rehearsal process with an expansion of the working vocabulary toward a more profound development and assimilation of the role. Roles will be chosen from contemporary scenes and monologues that will challenge the actor's characterization potential.

DR 644: Design Conversations

3.00 Credits

Design Conversations is required for Playwrights and Directors and an option for MA students. It incorporates Design, Direction, Dramaturgy, and Theory with a close reading of dramatic literature.

DR 650: Elements of Directing III

3.00 Credits

Students in the M.F.A. directing program discuss current production projects and issues in contemporary theatre practice.

DR 651: Elements of Directing I

3.00 Credits

This process-oriented and hands-on course introduces students to the fundamental principles of Directing. Approaching dramatic material from a directorial point of view, the focus is on the methods of collaboration between the director and the actors. The course, drawing upon Stanislavski's ideas of theatre, develops the student's directorial talent, imagination, skills and craft. The transitional process from page to stage, including the analytical process, casting, rehearsal process, and working with the actors and other artists, creators, and collaborators are explored and investigated. This course culminates in the direction of a short scene from a play for public performance. For MFA students

DR 652: Elements of Directing II

3.00 Credits

This is continuation of DR 651. The focus is on more complex directorial issues, including the creation of an imaginary world on the stage and the presence of the actor/character in space and time. Dealing with action, composition, and mise-en-scene are explored and addressed. This work culminates in the direction of a One-Act play or an Act from a full-length play. For MFA students

DR 660: Playwriting Strategies

3.00 Credits

Exploration of strategies by which selected playwrights have organized their work to produce effective plays. For M.F.A. students. Faculty.

DR 661: Writing in the Profession

3.00 Credits

The work of second- or third-year playwrights is critiqued by a professional writer, from the perspective of professional venues of theatre, film, or television. Faculty.

DR 670: Portfolio Evaluation

1.00-3.00 Credits

Designed for students entering an M.F.A. program with considerable prior professional experience in the theatre who seek specific course credit for knowledge gained in their extra-institutional work. These credits are not for courses completed at another academic institution. Students who seek credit for prior learning in a professional setting are required to demonstrate an understanding and command of the skills and knowledge expected of students completing an M.F.A. program in the Drama Department. Prior to being admitted into a program, an applicant must present a portfolio to the appropriate program Head. The portfolio should provide comprehensive evidence of the skills and knowledge for which academic credit is being requested. The applicant may provide documentation in the form of theatre programs, photographs, audio/video recordings, reviews by professional critics, letters from directors or professional theatre teachers, and an essay by the applicant explaining the match between this work and the goals and objectives of the course for which credit is being requested. The student may consult with the appropriate program Head for further guidance. The maximum number of credit hours that may be awarded for transfer credit and portfolio evaluation combined is 24. The program Head and the Associate Chair must approve of the credits before the applicant enters into the graduate program. Once the credits are approved, the student must register for and complete DR 670 in the first year of his or her studies. This course may be repeated once in the first year of the program if the student seeks course credit for more than 12 credit hours in one semester.

DR 692: Directed Readings

3.00 Credits

Faculty.

DR 694A: Independent Study: Playwriting

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 695A: Research Internship

3.00 Credits

Advanced students in the M.A. program work on an approved research project or as interns in a research collection and on projects mutually agreeable to the collection staff, the Program Directors, and the student. Each student is responsible for seeking such internships as may be available. The student seeking an internship must develop a detailed proposal. In the case of a research collection internship, the proposal should specify the responsibility of the extent of the commitment in terms of time, and the means by which the student is to be evaluated. Proposals will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, considering the appropriateness of the proposed internship to the student's program and academic record. Prerequisite: Permission of instructors.

DR 695B: Playwriting Internship

3.00 Credits

Advanced playwriting students in the M.F.A. program work with a professional theatre company in such capacities as are mutually agreed upon by the student, the company, and the Program Directors. Students seeking an internship must develop, in conjunction with the instructor and the responsible member(s) of the theatre staff, a detailed proposal that includes a description of the responsibilities of the student, the extent of the commitment, and the means by which the student is to be evaluated. The availability of internships cannot be guaranteed. Proposals will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, considering the function of the internship within the student's program and the student's record. Students working in internships should commit to no other departmental obligations in that term and should be aware that an internship may lengthen the time needed to complete the program.

DR 695C: Directing Internship

3.00 Credits

Advanced M.F.A. students work with a professional theatre company in such capacities as are mutually agreed upon by the student, the company, and the Program Director. Each student is responsible for seeking and winning such an internship position; the availability of internships cannot be guaranteed. The student must develop, in conjunction with the instructor and responsible members of the professional theatre staff, a detailed proposal that includes a description of the responsibilities of the student, the extent of the commitment in terms of time, and the means by which the student is to be evaluated at the end of the internship. Proposals will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, considering the impact on the department's productions, the value of the internship for the particular student's development, and the student's overall record. Students working in internships should commit to no other department obligations in that term and should be aware that an internship may lengthen the time needed to complete the degree program.

DR 695E: Dramaturgy Internship

3.00 Credits

The chief project for the seminar will be dramaturging a current production. The project, in the assessment of the instructor, must entail work distinctly different from the student's project in Dramaturgy I, whether in playwright, period, or production concept. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and Program Director.

DR 696: Master's Thesis Guidance

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 697: MFA Playwright Production

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 698A: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0.00 Credits

no description available

DR 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0.00 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

DR 730: Graduate Acting III

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 731: Graduate Acting IV

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 733: Voice I

2.00 Credits

First in a four semester sequence designed to: enrich students' physical, vocal, mental and emotional understanding of their voice instrument, habits and patterns; enable them to experience and, by choice, to release negative habitual patterns; explore the relationships among concentrated relaxation, breathing and sound initiation and resonance production and to extend the students' discovery of habitual tension release and sound exploration into text, characterization and emotional life of those characters. Plan = M.F.A.

DR 734: Voice II

2.00 Credits

Second in a four semester sequence designed to: enhance students' hearing ability to enable them both to hear individual sounds and the variations used in world languages and enable students' to produce individual sounds and the variations used in world languages through the study of the International Phonetic Alphabet in specific relationship to text, characterization and intentions and emotional life of those characters. In addition, students will develop a methodology for learning and researching all dialects and accents work through basic European and American dialects used regularly in theatre and film, work with texts specifically written for the various accents to enable students to create dialects based on playwright's language work, time period, social and cultural conditions and characters. Plan = M.F.A.

DR 739: Performance Studio III

3.00 Credits

Styles in performance. The class will explore the presentational and representational performance with classical texts. It will concentrate on Shakespearean characterization, utilizing sonnets, monologues and scenes. The second half of the semester will rehearse the plays of Moliere and Restoration comedies.

DR 750: Elements of Directing IV

3.00 Credits

Students in the M.F.A. directing program discuss current production projects and issues in contemporary theatre practice.

DR 751: Graduate Directing V

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 755: Directing Thesis Workshop

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 762: Adaptation

3.00 Credits

Second-year playwrights explore issues of adaptation, considering both dramatic and nondramatic sources. Students with a working knowledge of a foreign language are encouraged to explore issues of translation. Final project: an adaptation or translation of a text selected by the student. For M.F.A. students. Faculty.

DR 831: Master Class

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 832: Master Class II

3.00 Credits

Directors and actors undertake assigned, abbreviated performance projects intended to challenge their range, sometimes in collaboration with playwrights or dramaturgs. All projects are supervised by faculty. Continuation of the emphasis on collaboration and process. For M.F.A. students.

DR 833: Voice III

2.00 Credits

Lecture/Studio Third in a four semester sequence designed to review first year vocal work; extend first year vocal work through pitch, inflection and range work within text: Greek Choral Work; singing as an extension of speech; work with Poetic Structures, primarily Shakespeare and Moliere; work with Heightened Text and Imagery, using opening choruses and soliloquies from Shakespeare and scenes and monologues from Moliere. Research period language with Shakespearean history, romance and confrontation scenes and research translation language through work on Moliere's poetry and prose translations of the same monologues and scenes. Plan = M.F.A

DR 834: Voice IV

2.00 Credits

Lecture/Studio Fourth in a four semester sequence designed to extend work on Shakespeare; integrate extended physical and vocal use in plays; extend students' vocal capacity in range, resonance and volume to accommodate various performance spaces and to prepare students for specific potential vocal careers in the theatre: radio, voice-over work in industrial film, television and radio commercials, books-on-tape as well as auditions, cold readings and prepared auditions. Plan = M.F.A.

DR 835: Forms of Movement V

2.00 Credits

Exercises in, and application of, a method of exploring voice and body, imagination and impulse. May be linked to performance work in production. For M.F.A. students. Faculty.

DR 836: Forms of Movement VI

2.00 Credits

Exercises in, and application of, a method of exploring voice and body, imagination and impulse. May be linked to performance work in production. For M.F.A. students. Faculty.

DR 837: Voice V: Dialects/Voice Over

1.00 Credits

no description available

DR 839: Performance Studio IV

3.00 Credits

Working with Contemporary Styles and Living Playwrights. Beginning with an exploration of contemporary style work and absurdist texts, the course will continue into more contemporary works by important emerging playwrights in the American theatre from the 1980's to today. Contemporary styles include such writers as Pinter, Beckett, Stoppard, Pirandello and Mamet. More recent and emerging contemporary playwrights include such writers as: Durang, Greenspan, Grimm, Howe, Emily Mann, Mac Wellman, Paula Vogel and others. Students will develop a one-person show, first by exploring an existing performance project and then by mounting a solo performance piece.

DR 850: Director's Forum

1.00 Credits

Students in the M.F.A. directing program discuss current production projects and issues in contemporary theatre practice.

DR 852: Directors Forum II

3.00 Credits

no description available

DR 931: Field Studies in Theatre Education

3.00 Credits

M.A.T.E. students, in conjunction with an instructor/advisor, will develop a detailed proposal for a project that will give them field experience in theatre education. The proposal will include a description of the responsibilities of the student, the extent of the commitment in terms of time, and the means by which the student is to be evaluated at the end of the project. Students will identify a site for their work and use this time in the field to put theory into practice and learn by doing and reflecting on their experiences.

DR 937: Audition Workshop

1.00 Credits

The business of acting. This class concentrates on choosing contemporary and classical monologues best suited for an audition. Class will explore the audition process itself, how to find work as an actor and insights into the day to day workplace of theatre, television, film and commercials. The class will discuss cold readings, creating showcases, voice-overs, meeting agents, contacting regional theatres, pictures & resumes, mailings and life as an actor in New York, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. It will endeavor to provide auditions and lectures with professional casting directors and guest artists. Actors will prepare performance material for either a NY showcase and/or the Washington, D.C. theatre community.

DR 939: Performance Studio V

3.00 Credits

Touring Company. Selected actors that will prepare material suitable to perform and teach in various schools and colleges located in the greater D.C and Baltimore areas.

DR 940: Performance Studio VI

3.00 Credits

Internship and preparation for NY/DC showcase. Professional internship/understudy or acting job at a greater Washington, D.C. area theatre. Showcase preparation will involve experimenting with contemporary works by emerging American playwrights as well as further exploration of scene work and monologues from previous CUA Drama classes and productions. Selected scenes and monologues will be rehearsed and produced as a "First Look" CUA Showcase in D.C., and possibly other cities such as L.A., Chicago and/or New York.

DR 950: Seminar: Directing

3.00 Credits

Direction of a full-length production by directing students in the M.F.A. program.

DR 951: Supervised Theatre Education Project

3.00 Credits

The goal of Supervised Theatre Education Project is to further the Master of Arts in Theatre Education (M.A.T.E.) students' development of skills as educators and theatre practitioners. Students will develop and implement a project designed to give them intense practical experience focused on a chosen aspect of the field of theatre education. Each student, in conjunction with an instructor/advisor, will develop a detailed proposal for the project. The proposal must be submitted to the student's project supervisor and to the M.A.T.E. Faculty Advisory Committee the semester before the student plans to begin the Supervised Theatre Education Project. In this culminating M.A.T.E. project, students are encouraged to be imaginative, innovative, reflective, and thorough in their approach to whatever aspect of theatre education their project addresses. All students must successfully complete 27 credits before they begin the supervised project.

DR 960: Seminar: Playwriting I

3.00 Credits

Students develop extended dramatic writing.

DR 961: Seminar: Playwriting II

3.00 Credits

Students develop extended dramatic writing.

DR 962: Seminar: Playwriting III

3.00 Credits

Students develop extended dramatic writing.

DR 963: Seminar: Playwriting IV

3.00 Credits

Students develop extended dramatic writing. This optional seminar is for third-year MFA playwrights.

DR 983: Seminar: Dramaturgy I

3.00 Credits

Study of the historical development and present-day role of the dramaturg, with the chief work of the seminar being dramaturgical work on a current production. See also 988. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

DR 984: Seminar: Shakespeare In Theatre

3.00 Credits

Study of Shakespeare's plays in performance. Subjects include the theatrical dynamics and production of selected plays in Shakespeare's playhouse and the theatrical and cultural study of significant productions in selected periods, such as modernism and postmodernism. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.